Paired with baseboard and stained or painted to match your trim, shoe molding (also known as “base shoe”) is a small, thin strip of molding that gives your room a finished look. Shoe molding adds a decorative touch while covering any gaps that might lie between the bottom of baseboard and the floor. Not all types of baseboard are suitable for installing shoe molding, however, so keep reading to find out if this slim trim is right for you—plus how to install it flawlessly. Tall baseboards were popular during the Greek Revival period in the early-to-mid 1800s, but the idea of adding shoe molding to baseboards began in Europe and the United States during the Victorian era of the late 1800s. That’s when mass production of wood trim made the molding readily available. Shoe molding, so called because it’s located at “shoe level,” caught on because it looked good and also helped seal out dirt and insects. Today, the main goal of both baseboard and shoe molding is to conceal the less-than-appealing transition between the bottom of the wall and the floor. Baseboard alone covers most of the gap, but because it’s larger than shoe molding, it’s relatively stiff and doesn’t conform well to ...