How to choose the best dog harness, according to experts

This article is powered by Shop TODAY. Our editors have independently selected the items featured in this article because we think they’re worth knowing about. Shop TODAY has affiliate relationships so we may get a small share of the revenue if you buy something through our links. For some, one of the best parts of having a dog — aside from puppy eyes and endless enthusiasm — is taking them for walks. It’s good for your body, too. According to a study from BioMedCentral’s Public Health Journal, dog owners walk on average 22 minutes longer each day than non-dog owners, logging nearly 2,800 more stepsy. If you fall into that camp, congratulations. If you’re using a traditional leash to walk your dog, you might want to reconsider. The pressure leashes exert on dog collars might be harmful for them. The most popular alternative — a harness — is much safer and has other benefits, to boot. “I always prefer harnesses,” says Natalie Marks, DVM, the medical director at Blum Animal Hospital in Chicago. She’s talking about full body carriages that fit dogs like a vest might, the leash then connecting to one point on them and reducing the harms of pulling back on it. “They limit pull and pr...

Whether you’re walking an eager puppy or a stronger older dog who loves to pull, having

Whether you’re walking an eager puppy or a stronger older dog who loves to pull, having one of the strongest dog leashes can help you keep control over your dog. But, because most manufacturers will claim their leash is strong, what features should you look out for in a strong leash? When you’re looking for a leash, first consider the fabric it’s made from. Nylon and paracord are typically sturdy, reliable materials. If you have an exceptionally strong pup, you may want to think about a metal chain option, too, which is not only resistant to pulling but also a great leash for dogs who chew. Whichever you choose, make sure it’s thick enough to withstand hard pulls. Another thing to keep in mind is your dog’s personality. If you have a dog who pulls hard, you’ll want something with shock absorption. If you have a rabid chewer, on the other hand, you’ll want a hefty chain they can’t gnaw through. Lastly, think about the types of activities you typically do together. If you take jogs or go hiking in the woods, a hand-free leash might make a good choice. By contrast, if you live in a crowded city where your pooch is always dodging humans, a retractable option will be help...