The sheet metal cutting market is dominated by fiber lasers because of their unmatched combination of productivity, precision, and cost-effectiveness. Fiber lasers in the 2–6 kW range have become workhorses for many fabrication shops, offering faster and more precise cutting of thin metal than legacy cutting technologies, such as carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers and plasma torches. Many fiber laser systems are, however, designed for cutting a limited range of metal thicknesses. Specifically, a small, tightly focused laser beam provides the fastest cutting speeds for thin gauges, but for thicker plate this small beam has significant limitations in edge quality and maximum thickness. Alternatively, a larger beam can improve the edge quality for thick plate because of the wider kerf, but with a substantial speed penalty for cutting thin sheet. Large fabrication shops may purchase multiple fiber laser tools, where each tool is dedicated to cutting a particular thickness range: a small-beam system for light gauges and a larger-beam system for thicker plate. Smaller fabrication shops that rely on one tool to cut the full range of metals will have lower productivity if they are limited to o...